Mollymook News

editor Ken Banks

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Ken Banks

Swimmers tackle the Rail Trail – Bike Ride

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The Mollymook Ocean Swimmers tackle the Rail Trail

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Mollymook ocean swimmers,Bike ride,Mollymook beach

Victorian Rail Trail – Bike Ride, Highlights

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Swimming Pool Opened for the Season

 

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Anyone for a few pool laps 

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Mollymook Ocean swimmers,mollymook beach,mollymook beach waterfront

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Tim Mooney writes from Singapore. The temperature is 25 C both in and out of the water. Unlike the Ulladulla sea pool this one here in Singapore is only 25 metres, so I do 40 laps three times a day to hopefully loose the baguettes n cheese. See you Monday. Maybe.

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Mollymook, Change of Season, Easterly wind

 

Mollymook ocean swimmers,Ulladulla sea pool,Mollymook beach,Mollymook Beach Waterfront

Mollymook surf this past week with the easterly and east nor east winds

 

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Ocean swimming was not inviting throughout the past week with the daily wind direction from either the east or east nor east making for a bumpy / choppy ocean with rips and currents prevalent.

The Ulladulla sea pool has been painted and Leisure centre staff advise it will be filled and available for use sometime during next week. A great back up for when conditions are not ideal at Mollymook.

Ray A. writes: “Hope all is well in the land of Molly, the rocky outcrop (pic below) remarkably overshadowing my powerful hulk is Monemvasia. This impregnable fortress town has been hotly contested over two thousand years,being presided over by Grecian, Venetian and Ottoman rulers. This citadel island was never breached but taken via the art of siege negotiation.  See you all soon“.

Red Algae Bloom at Mollymook Beach

 

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Red Algae Bloom at Mollymook Beach, Saturday afternoon

 

The following information was found on the web in relation to ‘Red Algae Bloom’.

According to Wikipedia the “red tide” is a common term used for a harmful algal bloom. It is not uncommon for it to occur nearly every summer. This bloom is caused by microscopic algae that produce toxins that kill fish and make shellfish dangerous to eat.

An article in the Washington Post back in July, reported: “a 26-foot whale shark found dead on Sanibel Island, on Florida’s southwestern Gulf Coast, its body riddled with the neurotoxin produced by tiny algae in the sea.

Marine scientists don’t know for sure how it died, but they have a suspect the Karenia brevis algae — a single-celled organism that’s currently in a massive bloom cycle, called a red tide. 

The red tide has claimed many many victims this year on the Florida coast, which has become a rotting marine graveyard. At least a hundred manatees, a dozen dolphins, thousands of fish, 300 sea turtles, and more have died or washed along shores in putrid-smelling masses. They were all likely felled by the red tide.

The red tide is a normal, seasonal occurrence in southwest Florida. But this year’s red tide has persisted since last November — nearly a year now — making it the worst bloom since 2006.” 

A BBC report had the following to say: “Since November 2017, the red tide has taken a toll on the marine life around this extremely diverse paradise. At least 29 manatees are confirmed to have died due to the toxin by the Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission (FWC). Seventy-four more deaths are being investigated. The FWC has documented 588 stranded sea turtles and attributes 318 of them to the red tide. 

But the red tide can also affect people. According to the National Oceanic Service, sea waves can cause K. brevis cells to release toxins into the air, causing skin irritations and respiratory problems. For people with chronic conditions such as asthma, the red tide can make them very sick.”

The following information was provided by Monica Mudge: 

A link to the recent algae seen at Jervis Bay. (Info from SCC)

http://doc.shoalhaven.nsw.gov.au/displaydoc.aspx?record=D11/139167

I’m trying to find out if it’s linked to all the red jellyfish currently in the ocean (the lions main jellyfish), which I believe it is. I’ll let you know.

A link to the recent story from the Narooma news regarding the jellyfish. 

https://www.naroomanewsonline.com.au/story/4279927/a-whole-smack-of-jellyfish-impacting-on-narooma-bermagui-photos/#slide=5

X Moni

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Editor: Ken Banks on behalf of the Mollymook Ocean Swimmers

Bike Ride – ‘Back of Burrill’

 

Mollymook ocean swimmers,Burrill Lake,Mollymook beach,Lake Tabourie,Mollymook Beach Waterfront

‘Back of Burrill’ – Bike Ride

 

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The day started with us wondering whether it would be too rainy to ride but after a few text messages and phone calls were exchanged, we gathered a group of 14 intrepid riders prepared to get wet.

Starting at Burrill Lions Park, we headed across the highway, turned into Wallaby Drive and then Wyoming Avenue to find the path to the heritage listed Aboriginal Cave. We stopped for a look at the cave, which was occupied for 20,000 years before European settlers arrived and from a time when the ocean shore was over 18 km further east than it is today. We then travelled along Burrill Lake Drive, with a notable and challenging detour suggested by Bobbie, finally exiting at Wheelbarrow Road. From here we headed across to the back of Lake Tabourie before returning to Burrill Lake, locking up 17 km overall. 

Beautiful scenery around Burrill Lake’s southern edge and Lake Tabourie.  Stand out performances by Issi who rode to the start from home, Simone for pure dare-devil Kamikaze riding and Kaitlin who managed the hardest part of the ride on a bike a bit too small until Mum (Cheryl) took pity and swapped for her bike on the way back. It was hard to keep up with Jacqui’s E Bike speed ascending the steeper hills but we gave it our best shot.

Riders included Bobbie & Lyn, Issi, Paul, John & Nikki, John & Jacqui, Cheryl & Caitlyn,  Robbie & Simone, John & Margy.

Commentary by John Louth and Pic credits, John and Simone

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Mollymook Swimmers – Worldwide News

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Mollymook Beach – France – Italy

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Mollymook Ocean swimmers,mollymook beach waterfront,Mollymook beach

Mollymook Ocean swimmers,mollymook beach waterfront,Mollymook beach

Mollymook Ocean swimmers,mollymook beach waterfront,Mollymook beach

Mollymook Ocean swimmers,mollymook beach waterfront,Mollymook beach

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The weekend finally brought some nice waves for the boys and girls. Above pics, Ed climbs onto a nice wave at Mollymook beach. 

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Swimming this time of the year 21c Water

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Tim swimming in the river at Camon, Sth France, water temp 21c

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Mollymook Ocean swimmers,Mollymook Beach,Mollymook Beach Waterfront

Mollymook Ocean swimmers,Mollymook Beach,Mollymook Beach Waterfront

Whilst we are struggling back here in Mollymook with water temps around 15 & 16c, Tim sends in a pic of his swim today, water temp 21c.

John Sarich visits the ‘TIP’

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John Sarich (nee Smeeth) after a swim at the ‘TIP’

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John’s pic of the ‘Snub Fin Dolphin’

 

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John Sarich provides an update on his travels. Presently at Cape York, the northern most point of the Australian continent.  Here he is coming out of the water at the northern end of  Frangipani  Beach. (On the western side of the very top (TIP) of Australia). It was a dip n dash. Up here you have crocodiles, stingers  and sharks. There were a couple of big locals waist deep on croc watch for a heap of local kids to have a dip, so I reasoned I ought to be safe with them on watch. 

Later he spotted a pod of ‘Australian Snub Fin Dolphins’ rounding the top of Australia from west to east. (It was the first time John had sighted ‘Snub Fin Dolphins’ and got the above pic of one of them) 

Just to explain their difference from most dolphins we see along coastal NSW. The Australian snubfin dolphin is easily recognised from other dolphins by its blunt, rounded head and absence of a beak. The only species it could be confused with is the dugong, which lack a dorsal fin and have a more robust shape. The dorsal fin in snubfin dolphins is small compared to other dolphins, with a tip that is blunt and rounded. The colour is generally pale to dark brown with the underside lighter in colour. It has an obvious, flexible, neck, and the tail fins have a shallow concave trailing edge and the flippers are large and broad. They are generally found across northern Australia (Qld, NT, WA) where they inhabit rivers and coastal waters. 

ART ON SHOW AT MILTON

 

Art,Gallery,Millhouse Art Gallery,Milton,NSW,Millhouse Gallery,mollymook beach waterfront

Art,Gallery,Millhouse Art Gallery,Milton,NSW,Millhouse Gallery,mollymook beach waterfront

 

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ART ON SHOW AT MILTON

 

Millhouse artists had a very successful opening of their new Spring and Aqua Exhibitions at the Courtyard Galleries Milton. The theme in the newly renovated Little Gallery is ‘Aqua’ and it runs till the end of November along with the exhibition in the main gallery. Artists are excited to have the extra hanging space as there are many talented new members who are keen to display their exciting artwork.

Both galleries are open for the Artfest Milton Gallery Walk from 6pm on Thursday 4th October.

Free admission and wheelchair access.

Everyone welcome to check it out as there’s a great variety of paintings both traditional and contemporary in all media.

Something for everyone!

 

OPEN:  Weekends and school holidays,    FROM:  10 a.m. – 3 p.m.    Phone:  02 4444 7211 (during opening hours)

Website: Millhouse Art Society

 

Mollymook Ocean Swimmers Book – PROGRESS UPDATE

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Sunday’s Practice Photo Shoot for ‘Swimmers Book Cover’

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Mollymook Ocean swimmers,Mollymook Beach,Mollymook Beach Waterfront

Portrait image in very low res for use on the web

Mollymook Ocean swimmers,Mollymook Beach,Mollymook Beach Waterfront

Landscape image in very low res for use on the web

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Just a brief update on progress. Above were some experimental images (not cropped nor the end result) to get the camera settings critiqued on the Sunday morning. Then on Monday morning we had more volunteers to help fill the image and appearing more relaxed. The above gives you some idea of what I would like to achieve for our Mollymook Swimmers (20 year history) book cover. Our swimmers entering the water early morning as is our routine.

My heartfelt sincere thanks for the expertise of Therese Spillane and her daughter Alex and partner Dane. Also my sincere thanks for the 6 swimmers on Sunday, Ben, Garry Hunt, Heather, Ross, Laura and Garry Jenner. They also came and backed up for Monday’s photo shoot along with additional support from Issi, Karelle, John White and Bob White.

Having a Whale of a time

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Mollymook Beach – Southern Right Whale and calf

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Mollymook Ocean swimmers,whale,Southern Right whale,Mollymook Beach,Mollymook Beach Waterfront

Southern Right Whale with its calf and the Mollymook Ocean swimmers.

 

It was a glorious morning at Mollymook. As the sun was rising so to was a black figure appearing up towards north Mollymook. Bit by bit it slowly began moving south only some 200 or so metres off shore. In a matter of time it became obvious this massive whale had its calf in tow. With its distinctive markings and squirting water in a V, we were able to make out that it was a southern right whale. It just so happened that it coincided with the early morning ocean swimmers time to enter the water.

The ocean fraternity are a sharing community.

Winter coming to an end in Mollymook

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A Dry – Wave less Winter drawing to an end.

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Mollymook Ocean swimmers,Mollymook Beach,Mollymook Beach Waterfront

Ed’s pic of the smoke during last week’s bush fires

 

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Last Wednesday swimmers arrived at Mollymook beach for their early morning ocean swim with a massive back drop of smoke rapidly moving eastward propelled by strong westerly winds. Ed’s pic above captures the amount of smoke that we were to later hear being caused by fires burning out of control at Mount Kingiman west of Milton-Ulladulla. Below are pics taken earlier that morning.

Click on images to enlarge

Issi swimming with the whales in Tonga

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Issi Swims with the Whales in Tonga

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Mollymook Ocean swimmers,Mollymook Beach

Issi swims with the whales

 

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Issi returns from her trip to Tonga and can’t wait to share some of her pics and videos with the Mollymook Ocean Swimmers of whales and the reef and atolls, she writes that “they are all quite stunning”.   

Issi continues to describe her trip: “My experience, being in the water off the Tongan Islands for about 40 min or so was quite unbelievable, to be about a metre at one point away from whales, under and on top of the water with these majestic huge wild mammals with fins and snorkel/mask, was unbelievable.   We were making eye contact with them.  At one stage the Tongan guide grabbed my fins and pulled me back, I was that close.   To see the juvenile whale and mum interacting at such close view.   I feel very very privileged and so lucky to have done this.   We all felt the same.   I’m still on a high. Also, from our rubber duckie we watched the most amazing breaching by a whale only about 10 mtrs away.”   

To watch Issi’s video’s of the whales click on the following links:           First Video.     Second Video.          

Chris and Sue’s Australian Odyssey

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Chris and Sue: Retirement – This is the Life

Chris and Sue's Australian Odyssey,Australian Odyssey,Mollymook Ocean swimmers,mollymook beach waterfront

It is dry out here

G’day to all at Mollymook! 

Well, after we returned to Far North Queensland we left the trusty motorhome in Cairns and headed up to “The Tip”, Cape York, in our eldest son’s 4WD and rooftop camper. Roughing it, with no shower and toilet, fridge, etc etc but SO much fun! The road was actually pretty good most of the way, having been graded for the school holidays. Nevertheless, we were glad we had not taken the motorhome as it may have turned into an IKEA flat pack given some of the corrugations and sudden dips in the road. 

From Cairns to The Tip is about 2000kms return, and has some of the most isolated and vast, dusty outback in Australia. We really enjoyed the red red dust and sense of vastness, yet pulling up to a station for the night and finding heaps of other intrepid travellers. And when I say station, I mean old telegraph stations or working cattle stations, not Central Railway! 

Most of the rivers and creeks are bone dry at this time of year, but there were a few croc free swimming holes which were wonderful. Water temp was 24 degrees, nice! 

A Beautiful Morning at Mollymook

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Glorious Mollymook

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Mollymook Ocean swimmers,mollymook beach waterfront,Mollymook Beach

Thursday  Sunrise, Mollymook Beach 

Mollymook Ocean swimmers,mollymook beach waterfront,Mollymook Beach

Friday Celebrations

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Birthday Girl Heather and some of her many special friends 

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Another glorious week culminating in Heather’s birthday celebrations after spending a great evening last night at St Isidore’s Restaurant and a morning swim today in 16c water temp. with a big smile.                (Click on images to enlarge)